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Category: Original Reviews

Responses to Peary’s “must see” movie reviews, as well as my own “must see” movie reviews up to and after 1986 (when Peary’s book was published).

Doctor Zhivago (1965)

Doctor Zhivago (1965)

“There are two kinds of women — and you, as we well know, are not the first kind.”

Synopsis:
In pre-Revolutionary Russia, a doctor (Omar Sharif) married to the kind daughter (Geraldine Chaplin) of family friends falls in love with a young woman (Julie Christie) who is being abused by her older lover (Rod Steiger), and whose fiance (Tom Courtenay) is becoming an increasingly radical Bolshevik.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Alec Guinness Films
  • David Lean Films
  • Doctors and Nurses
  • Geraldine Chaplin Films
  • Historical Drama
  • Infidelity
  • Julie Christie Films
  • Love Triangle
  • Omar Sharif Films
  • Ralph Richardson Films
  • Revolutionaries
  • Rita Tushingham Films
  • Rod Steiger Films
  • Tom Courtenay Films
  • Writers

Review:
Peary doesn’t review this epic film by director David Lean — based on Boris Pasternak’s 592 page 1957 novel — in his GFTFF, but he does mention it briefly in his Alternate Oscars, where he asserts that it “comes across as lumbering, pedestrian, and artificial” and notes that “Omar Sharif’s heart attack sequence” is among “the most wretched in film history” (!). Upon my first rewatching of this Oscar-nominated historical drama since my teenage years, I was, unfortunately, also not very taken in. The sets and cinematography (by Freddy Young) are stunning, but the multi-faceted storyline — so complex in Pasternak’s novel that an intricated character map has been created — perhaps inevitably covers far too much territory, without digging meaningfully into character motivations.

Zhivago himself, for instance, is a cipher, with Sharif simply staring out of his liquidy brown eyes most of the time:

… and while it’s clear that Christie’s character (Lara) has gotten herself enmeshed with a sociopathic monster (Steiger), we don’t really understand her back story, including her relationship with Courtenay (whose character is only very loosely limned).

Meanwhile, a major narrative challenge is that Sharif is married to kind Chaplin, and we can’t help disliking him immensely for harming her through infidelity.

While we’re supposed to root for this couple (Zhivago and Lara, who gets her own theme song), we simultaneously feel terrible about it. The gorgeous visuals are the primary reason to check out this phenomenally popular film, which is “the eighth-highest grossing movie of all time”.

Note: Watch for Klaus Kinski in a brief but memorable role as a haunted soldier.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Rod Steiger as Komarovsky
  • Beautiful sets, costumes, and location filming
  • Freddy Young’s cinematography
  • Maurice Jarre’s instantly memorable score

Must See?
No, though of course it’s worth a one time look for its historical relevance.

(Listed in 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die)

Links:

Long Day’s Journey Into Night (1962)

Long Day’s Journey Into Night (1962)

“I know this game backwards.”

Synopsis:
In the summer of 1912, a miserly retired actor (Ralph Richardson) and his morphine-addicted wife (Katharine Hepburn) interact with their alcoholic older son (Jason Robards, Jr.) and consumptive younger son (Dean Stockwell).

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Alcoholism and Drug Addiction
  • Dean Stockwell Films
  • Family Problems
  • Grown Children
  • Jason Robards, Jr. Films
  • Katharine Hepburn Films
  • Play Adaptations
  • Ralph Richardson Films
  • Sidney Lumet Films

Review:
Sidney Lumet directed this first screen adaptation of Eugene O’Neill’s 1957 semi-autobiographical Broadway play, widely considered his magnum opus. Shot in sequence after three weeks of rehearsal, it tells a harsh, intentionally claustrophobic tale of deep-seated family dysfunctions emerging over the course of one “long day”. Hepburn was nominated for an Academy Award for her performance as Mary Tyrone, a matriarch prescribed morphine upon the challenging birth of her third son (after the early loss of her second) — and to that end, the central theme of a family member who becomes unwittingly addicted to prescription drugs (and simply can’t quit them) rings remarkably true and current.

Meanwhile, the tensions that inevitably emerge whenever grown children return to their parents’ household are shown in full force, with choices around money playing a particularly relevant role. To the credit of everyone involved in this production — from (deceased) O’Neill to Lumet, to the powerful cast, composer André Previn, and a highly capable crew — this undeniable downer of a story never lags, and remains surprisingly compelling throughout its nearly 3-hour running time. While it’s not for all tastes, film fanatics will likely appreciate watching it at least once.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Katharine Hepburn as Mary
  • Ralph Richardson as James Tyrone
  • Dean Stockwell as Edmund
  • Jason Robards, Jr. as Jamie
  • Boris Kaufman’s cinematography
  • André Previn’s intriguing score

Must See?
Yes, as a powerfully filmed adaptation of a classic American play. Listed as a film with Historical Importance and a Personal Recommendation in the back of Peary’s book.

Categories

  • Good Show

Links:

Room With a View, A (1985)

Room With a View, A (1985)

“He’s the sort who can’t know anyone intimately, least of all a woman.”

Synopsis:
When a British woman (Helena Bonham Carter) travelling in Italy with her spinster aunt (Maggie Smith) encounters a free-spirited young man (Julian Sands) staying with his father (Denholm Elliott) in the same rooming house, she becomes confused about her feelings for Sands, and rushes into a formal engagement with her priggish suitor (Daniel Day-Lewis) once she’s back home.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Coming of Age
  • Historical Drama
  • Love Triangle
  • Merchant Ivory Films
  • Romantic Comedy

Review:
Director James Ivory and producer Ismail Merchant’s adaptation of E.M. Forster’s 1908 novel — scripted by their longtime collaborator, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala — was their breakthrough box office success, earning them 8 Oscar nominations (it won 3 — for costume design, art direction, and adapted screenplay). It also offered Helena Bonham Carter her first major role — and she’s perfectly cast as a sheltered but passionate young woman whose sexual awakening and coming of age are precipitated by two key events in Italy: witnessing a brutal stabbing on the streets of Florence, and being kissed in a field by Sands.

She gradually comes to realize that the man she believes she should marry (Day-Lewis) is nothing close to who she actually wants to be with:

… though it’s far from easy for her to acknowledge this openly — a tension which drives the entire screenplay. While the storyline is rather thin in major plot points, it’s richly textured, and populated by numerous quirky supporting characters — including Maggie Smith as Lucy’s manipulative aunt:

… Simon Callow as a local reverend who seems to always be hovering around the periphery of events:

… Judi Dench as the novelist “Eleanor Lavish”:

… Denholm Elliott as Sands’ father, “Mr. Emerson”:

… and Rupert Graves (in his debut role) as Lucy’s hyper-active brother. (The scene in which he, Sands, and Callow frolic nude in the lake is refreshingly unfiltered.)

Day-Lewis’s snobby “Cecil Vyse” — played for laughs — is ultimately too outrageous to generate much sympathy; but we fall for gorgeous Sands, and are glad to see him returning time and again into Lucy’s life: this is a romantic pairing we very much want to see succeed.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Helena Bonham Carter as Lucy Honeychurch
  • Julian Sands as George Emerson
  • Fine cinematography and location shooting

Must See?
Yes. Listed as a film with Historical Importance and a Personal Recommendation in the back of Peary’s book.

Categories

  • Genuine Classic

(Listed in 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die)

Links:

St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, The (1967)

St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, The (1967)

“I’ll send flowers.”

Synopsis:
During the height of the Prohibition era, Chicagoland gangster Al Capone (Jason Robards) plots to kill his rival, Bugs Moran (Ralph Meeker).

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Bruce Dern Films
  • Gangsters
  • George Segal Films
  • Jack Nicholson Films
  • Jason Robards Films
  • Prohibition Era
  • Ralph Meeker Films
  • Roger Corman Films

Review:
B-movie producer/director Roger Corman was given a substantial budget and studio backing (from 20th Century Fox) to make this “authentic” docudrama flick about one of the most notorious mass murders in gang warfare history. As Paul Frees’ voiceover narration helpfully informs us during the film’s opening shots:

In the years following the passage of the National Prohibition Act of 1920, the nation’s underworld rises to power and battles amongst itself, just as modern nations and corporations do. Open periods of gang warfare are followed by peace treaties, and attempts at consolidation and monopoly, each of which is shattered as new warfare erupts in quest of the booming bootlegging and vice profits. By 1929, the gangs of Chicago operate 21,207 speakeasies, and their gross income reaches $357 million. 618 members of the city’s underworld are murdered within nine years. Corruption extends from the mayor’s office to the humblest side-street speakeasy.

Robards was given a hard time for looking nothing like the actual Al Capone (Orson Welles was the original choice), but he’s effectively surly as the murderous kingpin who will stop at nothing to see his nemesis destroyed:

… and Meeker seems reasonably well-cast as Bugs Moran.

Meanwhile, throughout the film, the voiceover narration provides us with information about each of the leader’s various followers. Peter Gusenberg (George Segal), for instance, is described thusly:

Peter Gusenberg: born Chicago, Illinois, September 22 of 1898. Ex-convict. Mail-robber. Burglar. Hijacker. Professional killer. When, at the age of 13, he came home from school to find his mother dead, his first act was to pry the wedding ring from her finger and pawn it.

… and John May (Bruce Dern) gets the following description.

John May: born Chicago, Illinois, September 28, 1897. Married. Seven children. Twice arrested on charges of safe-blowing and burglary. No convictions. Has worked occasionally for the Moran gang as an auto mechanic. He has promised his wife he will stay out of further trouble with the law, but he is three months behind in the rent.

For others, we’re informed about the cause and date of their eventual demise as well:

Francesco Nittoni, alias Frank “The Enforcer” Nitti: born Montedoro, Sicily, January 9, 1887. Nitti is in charge of the Capone organization’s punishment squad, made up of accomplished strong-arm men and professional killers. On March 19, 1943, while under indictment for income tax evasion, Nitti will use a gun for the last time, to take his own life.

There are a lot of supporting characters in this tale — but history buffs interested in tracking it all will likely find it engaging. Meanwhile, all-purpose film fanatics may enjoy briefly spotting both Jack Nicholson (see him there?):

… and (of course) Dick Miller.

And, naturally, there’s plenty of violence to be had.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Milton Krasner’s cinematography
  • Lionel Newman and Fred Steiner’s score

Must See?
No, though it’s worth a one-time look. Listed as a Cult Movie in the back of Peary’s book.

Links:

Greatest Story Ever Told, The (1965)

Greatest Story Ever Told, The (1965)

“Come with me; I will make you fishers of men.”

Synopsis:
Despite a proclamation by King Herod (Claude Rains) to kill all newborn boys in Bethlehem, Mary (Dorothy McGuire) gives birth to her son Jesus, who grows up to become a spiritual leader (Max von Sydow).

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Angela Lansbury Films
  • Biblical Stories
  • Carroll Baker Films
  • Charlton Heston Films
  • Christianity
  • Claude Rains Films
  • Donald Pleasence Films
  • Dorothy McGuire Films
  • Ensemble Cast
  • George Stevens Films
  • Janet Margolin Films
  • John Wayne Films
  • Jose Ferrer Films
  • Martin Landau Films
  • Max von Sydow Films
  • Paul Stewart Films
  • Richard Conte Films
  • Roddy McDowall Films
  • Sal Mineo Films
  • Shelley Winters Films
  • Sidney Poitier Films
  • Telly Savalas Films
  • Van Heflin Films

Review:
In between helming The Diary of Anne Frank (1959) and The Only Game in Town (1970) (his final film), George Stevens directed this lengthy, meticulously crafted ensemble tale about the life of Jesus Christ, filmed largely on location in the American Southwest. Anyone who’s attended Sunday School will instantly recognize all the tales told here, especially given how much of the language seems to be taken directly from the Scriptures — and it’s easy to see how Christians would appreciate this sincere and visually impressive dramatization of their holy book. Indeed, this film’s scale is truly epic, featuring gorgeous Ultra Panavision cinematography by William C. Mellor, and cameo roles for seemingly dozens of big-name Hollywood stars.

Swedish actor Max von Sydow made his American debut as the lead figure, offering an impressively human portrayal as perhaps the most famous and beloved individual of all time.

Other relatively significant roles in the narrative are played by Jose Ferrer as King Herod’s son, Herod Antipas:

… Charlton Heston as John the Baptist:

… Telly Savalas (who shaved his head for this role, and continued doing so ever after) as Pontius Pilate:

… and Gary Raymond as Peter.

Other appearances — some for several scenes, others for literally seconds (if that) — include Dorothy McGuire as Mary:

… Donald Pleasence as the Devil (who tries to tempt Jesus during his fast in the desert):

… Sal Mineo as a crippled man cured by a miracle:

… Claude Rains (in his final role) as King Herod:

… Sidney Poitier as Simon of Cyrene:

… and, perhaps most infamously, Shelley Winters as a “Woman Who Is Healed”:

… and John Wayne speaking a single line in his iconic drawl near the end of the film: “Truly, this man was the Son of God.”

Other than von Sydow, my favorite performance is by David McCallum as a sorrowful Judas (though, as is the case across the board in this film, we don’t learn enough about him).

See the list of Actors above (or on IMDb) for an even more exhaustive list of who appears at some point.

Unfortunately, while Stevens’ film is entirely earnest — and gorgeous to look at — it’s lengthy, often slow, and not all that compelling as a cinematic narrative (there are no “plot twists” for anyone reasonably familiar with the arc of Jesus’s life). According to TCM’s article, the film wasn’t commercially successful at all — in fact, “audiences stayed away in droves, making The Greatest Story Ever Told the greatest financial flop ever made until the release of Heaven’s Gate in 1980.” However, the film was nominated for five Academy Awards, and, not surprisingly, became “a popular rental film at churches, schools, and film societies in the non-theatrical market.”

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Max von Sydow as Jesus Christ
  • Beautiful Panavision cinematography

  • Alfred Newman’s score

Must See?
No, but it’s recommended simply for von Sydow’s performance, and for its historical significance.

Links:

Greatest, The (1977)

Greatest, The (1977)

“I’m known as Muhammad Ali; Cassius Clay is dead.”

Synopsis:
Muhammad Ali (playing himself) reflects back on his life as a young man (Chip McAllister) and a rising boxing star, as he converts to Islam, refuses to be drafted into the Vietnam War, and receives support from his manager (Lloyd Haynes), trainer (Ernest Borgnine), and physician (John Marley).

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • African-Americans
  • Biopic
  • Boxing
  • Ernest Borgnine Films
  • Robert Duvall Films

Review:
Muhammad Ali starred as himself in this adaptation of his 1975 autobiography of the same name (which was purportedly heavily influenced by his manager, Herbert Muhammad). Indeed, it presents a highly sanitized version of Ali’s life, sugarcoating and distilling key motivational moments, and conveniently skipping a whole lot. Then again, that’s par-for-the-course with a biopic — especially one with such heavy involvement from the person being covered.

I’m aware this film may have played differently upon its release, when Americans were likely keenly interested in getting to learn more about one of their beloved sports idols; these days, the storyline simply feels self-laudatory, as Ali easily snatches up a bodaciously beautiful girlfriend (Mira Waters):

… and then shows off his newfound piety by pursuing a primly dressed bakery worker (Annazette Chase) who he chooses to become his wife. (On a side note, I was interested to learn about the history and relevance of “bean pie” in Muslim Black culture.)

The most exciting moments in the film by far are the (real life) fight sequences, which are expertly woven into the dramatized storyline. Meanwhile, the cast is an interesting one, with Borgnine and Marley in key supporting roles as right-hand men for Ali:

… and cameos by other well-known actors, including Robert Duvall as fight promoter Bill McDonald:

… Dina Merrill as a nastily racist spectator:

… and James Earl Jones as Malcolm X.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Effective integration of real-life fighting footage into the dramatic narrative

Must See?
No, unless you’re an Ali fan.

Links:

Tunes of Glory (1960)

Tunes of Glory (1960)

“Though shalt not bash a corporal: that’s different; that’s the law.”

Synopsis:
When a new commander (John Mills) arrives to take over a Scottish Highlands battalion, the resentful acting officer (Alec Guinness) becomes drunk, at which points he lashes out at a young bagpiper (John Fraser) seen in a pub with his daughter (Susannah York), and must face the severe consequences of his actions.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Alec Guinness Films
  • John Mills Films
  • Military
  • Rivalry
  • Susannah York Films

Review:
Ronald Neame directed this adaptation of a 1956 novel by James Kennaway, about tense dynamics between radically different leaders at a Scottish Highlands military base shortly after the end of World War II. Guinness — who starred in Neame’s previous feature, The Horse’s Mouth (1958) — was originally considered a shoo-in for the rule-following character played by Mills, but Guinness wanted the challenge of playing a commander much different from his Oscar-winning role as Col. Nicholson in The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957).

Mills — whose character suffers from military-induced PTSD (he was water-boarded while a POW) — is in the unfortunate position of taking over command from a charismatic individual whose men mostly love him; when faced with meting out a harsh but required reprimand to Guinness, the extent of Mills’s shattered nerves comes into sharp focus.

To its credit, the film doesn’t present either man as either entirely likable or villainous, thus making the film’s shocking final third especially challenging to take in. Among numerous memorable faces in the cast (including Gordon Jackson and Duncan MacRae), watch for Kay Walsh as Guinness’s sometimes-girlfriend:

… Susannah York (in her cinematic debut) as Guinness’s grown daughter:

… and Dennis Price in a crucial supporting role as an oily major.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Alec Guinness as Major Jock Sinclair
  • John Mills as Lt. Col. Basil Burrow
  • Fine production design

Must See?
No, but it’s worth a one-time look for Guinness’s performance.

Links:

Smooth Talk (1985)

Smooth Talk (1985)

“I know my Connie; I’ve been watching you.”

Synopsis:
A teenager (Laura Dern) rebelling against her restrictive mother (Mary Kay Place) and seeking attention from boys encounters a mysterious, creepy older man (Treat Williams) who insists on taking her for a ride in his car.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Coming of Age
  • Obsessive Love
  • Sexuality
  • Teenagers

Review:
Just after her acclaimed supporting role in Peter Bogdanovich’s Mask (1985), Laura Dern was offered a breakthrough leading role in this independent feature — directed by Joyce Chopra, and based on a short story by Joyce Carol Oates — about a teenager’s rocky coming of age and sexual awakening. The first hour of the 90-minute film details Dern’s strained relationship with her exasperated mother (Place), who frankly comes across like an unreasonably cranky and snarky parental figure.

Meanwhile, we don’t get to know much about Dern’s quirky father (Levon Helm) or dour older sister (Berridge) either, instead following Dern as she spends time at the mall and a drive-in with her two besties (Margaret Welsh and Sara Inglis):

… and is clearly very interested in presenting herself as a sexually attractive young woman (albeit one who puts limits on how far she’ll go). The inclusion of Williams’ character (who we only see in brief snippets throughout the first hour) was actually at the core of Oates’s original story, which itself was inspired by serial killer Charles Schmid.

To that end, the final third of the film is its most creepy by far — but also its most puzzling (and ultimately unsatisfying), given that we’re not explicitly told whether Treat’s character is any kind of killer (or not), and too much is left to the imagination. What is clear is that Dern is somewhat intrigued by (and attracted to) this handsome stranger, while also recognizing the risks he poses to her if she agrees to his forceful demands.

While I admire much about this well-filmed coming-of-age tale (primarily Dern’s fearless, spot-on performance), it’s not must-see viewing except for fans of Dern’s or Williams’ work.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Laura Dern as Connie
  • Treat Williams as Arthur Friend
  • James Glennon’s cinematography

Must See?
No, though it’s recommended for one-time viewing. Listed as a Sleeper in the back of Peary’s book.

Links:

Through a Glass Darkly (1961)

Through a Glass Darkly (1961)

“It’s so horrible to see your own confusion and understand it.”

Synopsis:
When a young woman (Harriet Andersson) recently released from a mental asylum arrives on a vacation island with her novelist father (Gunnar Björnstrand), her loving husband (Max von Sydow), and her younger brother (Lars Passgård), it quickly becomes apparent to everyone that Karin (Andersson) is far from well.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Family Problems
  • Ingmar Bergman Films
  • Max von Sydow Films
  • Mental Breakdown
  • Mental Illness
  • Scandinavian Films

Review:
Ingmar Bergman won his second Academy Award for Best Foreign Picture with this first entry in an informal trilogy of thematically related movies — followed by Winter Light (1963) and The Silence (1963) — which provides a deeply dark meditation on God, sanity, love, and familial relations. Andersson — who had starred in several of Bergman’s earlier films, including Sawdust and Tinsel (1953) and Smiles of a Summer Night (1955) — gives a heartbreaking performance as a young woman who knows her sanity is at ongoing risk, and must deal with not only manipulation by her father and brother, but knowing she can’t fully satisfy her loving, patient husband.

The film is stark and sparse, featuring only a quartet of actors, a single primary location (the island of Fårö), and minimalist but effective use of the Sarabande from Suite No. 2 in D minor for Violoncello by J.S. Bach. While it’s not must-see for all film fanatics, Bergman fans will likely appreciate seeing this early distillation of some of his most trenchant themes.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Harriet Andersson as Karin
  • Fine supporting performances
  • Sven Nykvist’s incomparable cinematography
  • Good use of location shooting in Fårö

Must See?
No, though it’s recommended for Bergman fans. Listed as a film with Historical Importance in the back of Peary’s book.

(Listed in 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die)

Links:

Zorba the Greek (1964)

Zorba the Greek (1964)

“To be alive is to undo your belt and look for trouble.”

Synopsis:
When a British-Greek writer (Alan Bates) arrives in Crete with the intention of opening a lignite mine, he meets a charismatic laborer named Zorba (Anthony Quinn) who quickly becomes an inextricable part of his life.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Alan Bates Films
  • Anthony Quinn Films
  • Character Studies
  • Greece
  • Mining Towns
  • Village Life
  • Widows and Widowers

Review:
Three years after co-starring in The Guns of Navarone (1961), Anthony Quinn and Greek actress Irene Papas were once again paired on-screen in this adaptation of Nikos Kazantzakis’s 1946 novel. Although the story follows Bates as he arrives in his rocky island village, it’s clear that the primary focus is on the larger-than-life title character, who has numerous “life lessons” to pass along to “Boss” (his affectionate nickname for Bates).

Zorba’s wisdom and guidance include the following, as evidenced from direct quotes:

“You think too much.”
“Why did God give us hands? To grab. Well, grab!”
“I got up, and I danced… It was the dancing — only the dancing — that stopped the pain.”
“Now I look at a man, any man, and I say, ‘He is good. He is bad.’ What do I care if he’s Greek or Turk?”
“A man needs a little madness, or else he never dares cut the rope and be free.”

So, the creatively-blocked Bates clearly must learn to “let go” and love life — which includes allowing himself to be seduced by a beautiful widow (Irene Papas) who the villagers wrongly believe “belongs” to another young man who is in love with her; but the outcome of their brief dalliance is nothing short of tragic.

Indeed, a primary take-away from this tale is that the type of morality-policing of women we still see going on (albeit now accompanied by a much-needed uprising) is endemic in some societies — alongside xenophobia, as exemplified by the villagers’ disdainful treatment of a local French woman (Lila Kedrova) who spends her time reminiscing about her numerous wartime lovers, and who Zorba takes pity on.

Her eventual fate near the end of the film is equally distressing, especially given that it’s primarily driven by other aging women.

Co-producer Quinn’s performance — while arguably over-the-top at times — drives the film, showing us the inherent complexity of this middle-aged dynamo, who lives, loves, dreams, and acts at full volume. His impassioned performance (along with Kedrova’s touching turn as a deluded former-siren) make this critically and commercially popular film worth a look, though it’s not must-see viewing.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Anthony Quinn as Zorba
  • Lila Kedrova as Madame Hortense
  • Walter Lassally’s Oscar-winning cinematography

  • Mikis Theodorakis’s instantly recognizable score

Must See?
No, but it’s recommended for one-time viewing. Listed as a film with Historical Importance and a Personal Recommendation in the back of Peary’s book.

Links: