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Category: Original Reviews

Responses to Peary’s “must see” movie reviews, as well as my own “must see” movie reviews up to and after 1986 (when Peary’s book was published).

Lion Is in The Streets, A (1953)

Lion Is in The Streets, A (1953)

“Sometimes a man ain’t got time for common sense.”

Synopsis:
In the Deep South, a street peddler (Jimmy Cagney) marries a schoolteacher (Barbara Hale) and has an affair with an adoring teenager (Anne Francis) while pursuing a career in politics and growing increasingly compromised in his ideals.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Anne Francis Films
  • Barbara Hale Films
  • Deep South
  • Jimmy Cagney Films
  • John McIntire Films
  • Lon Chaney, Jr. Films
  • Political Corruption
  • Raoul Walsh Films

Review:
It’s easy to see why both Jimmy Cagney and Raoul Walsh later preferred not to discuss their involvement in this clunker of a political melodrama, loosely based on the life of Huey Long (though by the time it was released, Robert Rossen’s All the Kings’ Men had already covered the same territory to award-winning acclaim). It comes across as a weird sort of vanity project, showcasing Cagney as a charismatic but poor peddler who somehow manages to sweep naive Hale off her feet:

… while maintaining the undying love of Francis (playing a bayou girl named “Flamingo”), who is upset to learn he’s gotten married and doesn’t consider that any kind of barrier to them spending their life together.

The crux of the storyline focuses on Cagney’s attempt to expose a local cotton company owner (Larry Keating) of cheating, and the trouble his friend Jeb Brown (John McIntire) gets into when things unintentionally turn violent.

Unfortunately, Cagney doesn’t seem to realize how addicted he is to power and success, eventually viewing his own political ascension as worthy of cheating and lying. The film is filled with ripe dialogue (“I’ll always be there waiting — belonging to you like a mule in a barn!”) and ludicrous scenarios that defy belief (i.e., the entire crocodile scene):

… but it all becomes morbidly fascinating during the final ten minutes or so, when we suddenly see events playing out in a fashion eerily reminiscent of recent American history.

Watch for Lon Chaney, Jr. as Francis’s dad:

… and Jimmy’s sister Jeanne in a pivotal supporting role as McIntire’s wife:

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Harry Stradling’s cinematography

Must See?
Nope; you can skip this one unless you’re curious.

Links:

Stranglers of Bombay, The (1959)

Stranglers of Bombay, The (1959)

“Look, sir, this is India: there are cults and religions that stretch back to the beginning of recorded time.”

Synopsis:
In 1830s India — as trade caravans mysteriously disappear and a high priest (George Pastell) leads his followers in deadly cultish rituals — a colonel (Guy Rolfe) for the British East India Company is disappointed to learn that his boss (Andrew Cruikshank) has appointed a family acquaintance (Allan Cuthbertson) rather than him to investigate the mystery. Will Captain Lewis (Rolfe) — with help from his supportive wife (Jan Holden) — be able to make any headway into solving the crimes?

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Cults
  • Historical Drama
  • Thieves and Criminals

Review:
Terence Fisher directed this historical adventure-horror film for Hammer Studios about the quest to capture a cult of Indian bandits known as Thugees, who terrorized travellers in the name of the goddess Kali. Unfortunately, lead actor Rolfe — probably best known by film lovers for co-starring opposite Robert Taylor in Ivanhoe (1952), and for starring as the title character in the non-GFTFF-listed Mr. Sardonicus by William Castle — isn’t all that charismatic:

Meanwhile, we loathe his priggish nemesis (Cuthbertson):

… and have mixed feelings about hissing at the bad guys given that they’re living under colonial subjugation.

The entire affair is exotic and atmospherically filmed, with several notoriously gruesome moments:


… but it will probably only be of interest to fans of this genre (or, of course, those wanting to see buxomy Marie Devereux as a cult follower who gets a kick out of seeing people tortured).

Check out DVD Savant’s review for Trailers From Hell for a much more in-depth analysis of this title, which was previously hard-to-find but is now available on DVD.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Arthur Grant’s cinematography

Must See?
No, though Hammer fans will likely want to check it out.

Links:

Pork Chop Hill (1959)

Pork Chop Hill (1959)

“We’re getting no place; every one of these trenches is a separate dogfight.”

Synopsis:
During the Korean War, Lieutenant Joe Clemons (Gregory Peck) does everything he can to try to recapture Pork Chop Hill from the Chinese People’s Volunteer Army, all while experiencing heavy losses, insufficient manpower, and ongoing cease-fire negotiations which may soon render any victory meaningless.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • George Peppard Films
  • Gregory Peck Films
  • Korean War
  • Lewis Milestone Films
  • Rip Torn Films
  • Woody Strode Films

Review:
Director Lewis Milestone — best known for his Academy Award winning World War I film All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) — made two other films depicting life on-the-ground for soldiers during military conflict: A Walk in the Sun (1945), taking place during WWII, and this film about a notoriously high-casualty maneuver occurring near the end of the Korean War (1950-1953). Ten years after starring as a no-nonsense flight commander in Twelve O’Clock High (1949), Gregory Peck returns as another military leader facing a truly daunting task — but this time around, his personality is less dominant and we’re more caught up in the collective experiences of his men. The entire film takes place during just one protracted battle, and nearly all we see is trench warfare:

… with occasional cut-aways to diplomatic negotiations:

Of special interest are the roles played by James Edwards and Woody Strode as Black soldiers, given that the Korean War forced mandated integration of troops for the first time (for purely pragmatic reasons). Strode is deeply uninterested in sacrificing his life for no good reason, while Edwards strives to hold him accountable:

Pork Chop Hill makes for a brutal but valuable portrait of motivation and decision-making in the midst of unimaginable constraints; it’s not a film I plan to revisit, but I’m glad I sat through it once. Watch for a host of familiar young male actors in the cast, including an uncredited Harry Dean Stanton in a brief early scene:

… Rip Torn as Lt. Walter Russel:

… George Peppard (prior to Breakfast at Tiffany’s) as Cpl. Chuck Fedderson (shown here next to Harry Guardino, playing a private eager to head home):

… Norman Fell (of “Three is Company” TV fame) as Sgt. Coleman:

… and Martin Landau in his brief film debut:

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Gregory Peck as Lt. Clemons
  • Sam Leavitt’s cinematography

Must See?
No, but it’s recommended for one-time viewing.

Links:

Magnificent Matador, The (1955)

Magnificent Matador, The (1955)

“The trick is to be able to live with the fear, and still face the bulls with dignity.”

Synopsis:
A socialite (Maureen O’Hara) falls in love with an aging matador (Anthony Quinn) who has disappointed his public by refusing to appear in a fight. Can Quinn be motivated to return to the arena and face the bulls alongside his protege (Manuel Rojas)?

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Anthony Quinn Films
  • Budd Boetticher Films
  • Bullfighting
  • Has-Beens
  • Maureen O’Hara Films

Review:
Director Budd Boetticher is best known for the set of westerns he made with Randolph Scott known as the “Ranown Cycle”: Seven Men From Now (1956), The Tall T (1957), Decision at Sundown (1957), Buchanan Rides Alone (1958), Ride Lonesome (1959), Westbound (1959), and Comanche Station (1960). However, he also made three films based on his first and most enduring love: bullfighting. His breakthrough movie was The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951), followed a few years later by this flick, which was apparently written simply to provide a substantial role for Anthony Quinn. Unfortunately, it’s much less compelling than his 1951 outing, and doesn’t have a whole lot going for it other than fine cinematography by Lucien Ballard and a couple of big names:

The screenplay and dialogue are incredibly hoary, with little to hold our interest or attention. Storywise, beautiful, wealthy O’Hara — used to getting whatever she wants — has a thing for bullfighters (Quinn in particular), causing her would-be lover (Richard Denning) to be both jealous and petty:

Quinn also has a jealous ex-lover (Lorraine Chanel) lurking in the periphery, without anything to do but sulk:

Meanwhile, a beloved friend (Thomas Gomez) who raises bulls affords Quinn a convenient opportunity to reconnect with his passion:

… and there’s also a minor storyline about a long-lost son — but none of this is particularly compelling. Film fanatics don’t need to bother checking this one out.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Lucian Ballard’s cinematography

Must See?
Nope; you can skip this one unless you’re a Boetticher completist or a diehard fan of one of the stars.

Links:

Quo Vadis (1951)

Quo Vadis (1951)

“People will believe any lie, if it is fantastic enough.”

Synopsis:
In Ancient Rome, a military commander (Robert Taylor) returns home to the court of Emperor Nero (Peter Ustinov) and Empress Poppaea (Patricia Laffan), who live a lavish, self-absorbed lifestyle as Nero’s advisor (Leo Genn) feeds him flattering lies. When Taylor falls for a beautiful Christian (Deborah Kerr) adopted by a retired general (Felix Aylmer), Taylor finds his own values in conflict with Kerr’s; meanwhile, Christians continue to meet and worship underground through guidance from the apostles Peter (Finlay Currie) and Paul (Abraham Sofaer) — but will Nero put up with this affront to his perceived divinity?

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Biblical Stories
  • Christianity
  • Deborah Kerr Films
  • Historical Drama
  • Mervyn LeRoy Films
  • Peter Ustinov Films
  • Robert Taylor Films
  • Ruthless Leaders

Review:
This top-grossing film of 1951 was produced by MGM Studios but filmed in Italy by director Mervyn LeRoy, with tens of thousands of extras overseen by a para-military style crew. The result is an historical epic truly impressive in its scope for the time:

… but bogged down by an unrealistic (would-be) romance between luminous Kerr and wooden Taylor, who made a career comeback with this film but isn’t particularly compelling:

Ustinov, on the other hand, holds nothing back in his performance as infantile Nero, who believes every word of flattery spoken to him by his advisor, Petronius, and is authentically convinced the world is lucky to be graced by his presence:

Oscar-nominated Genn is perfectly cast as Petronius, whose contempt for Nero is thinly yet effectively veiled. However, I’m not sure why a random subplot about a slave (Marina Berti) throwing herself at Genn is included in this overly lengthy (nearly three-hour) movie, other than to showcase yet another beautiful woman in the cast:

This is also likely the reason for one of Nero’s spurned lovers (Rosalie Crutchley) showing up every now and then:

… though at least her character (freedwoman Claudia Acte) was a real-life figure and a significant influence in Nero’s life. Meanwhile, Laffan has great fun playing Nero’s lascivious wife Poppaea, who lusts after Taylor and seeks vengeance when he rejects her:

Kerr is gorgeous, but not given much depth in a role that simply requires her to be a devoted Christian and (eventually) a willing partner to Taylor:

The most impressive sequence is the burning of Rome, which according to TCM required months of construction to build and 24 evenings to burn down.

The most controversial scenes, however — earning the film an X certificate in Britain — were those of lions tearing into Christians to provide a spectacle for Nero’s masses:

Speaking of Nero and his masses, Ustinov is given a number of chilling lines to recite. In addition to justifying the burning of Rome simply to foster his creative “genius”, he ignores Petronius’s warnings and decides to blame the Christians for his misdeeds:

Petronius: (to Nero) Condemn these Christians and you make martyrs of them, and insure their immortality. Condemn them, and in the eyes of history, you’ll condemn yourself.

Nero: When I have finished with these Christians, Petronius, history will not be sure that they ever existed.

Yikes.

While Quo Vadis isn’t must-see viewing for all film fanatics, it’s worth a look both for the impressive spectacle it puts forth, and for Ustinov’s portrayal as one of history’s most powerful sociopaths.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Peter Ustinov as Nero
  • Leo Genn as Petronius
  • Patricia Laffan as Poppaea
  • Gorgeous Technicolor cinematography

  • The remarkable burning-of-Rome sequence (purportedly filmed by the movie’s original director, Anthony Mann)

Must See?
No, though it’s certainly worth a look.

Links:

Viva Villa! (1934)

Viva Villa! (1934)

“I once thought Pancho Villa was a hero — a great man!”

Synopsis:
Seeking revenge for his murdered father, Pancho Villa (Wallace Beery) becomes a fierce bandit and then a general in the Mexican Revolution, supporting new President Francisco Madero (Henry B. Walthall) — but will his goal of returning land to the peasants ever become a reality?

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Biopic
  • Fay Wray Films
  • Historical Drama
  • Journalists
  • Revolutionaries
  • Wallace Beery Films

Review:
This highly fanciful Pre-Code rendering of the legend of Pancho Villa (scripted by Ben Hecht) was nominated for an Academy Award as one of the Best Pictures of the Year, and was hugely popular at the box office. Unfortunately, it comes across today as a mostly offensive effort, primarily given the casting of buffoonish Beery in the lead role, not to mention no Latinos in the cast at all (a norm for the time, but still noticeable).

The film seems designed to portray Villa in a legendary if authentically problematic light, given the role played by Stuart Erwin as an American reporter eager for scoops:

… yet justice simply isn’t done to the complexity of this folk hero’s legacy. Ultimately, the movie’s extremely challenging production history — including Howard Hawks bowing out as its initial director — is more interesting than the finished product; according to TCM’s article:

During the location shoot [in Mexico], real soldiers and peasants were used as extras, and some of them were quite a bit wilder than MGM expected. … Shootings often took place near the set, and one man inexplicably turned a pistol on himself after speeding by and crashing his car through a fence. MGM’s crew was housed in old railroad cars, and they were regularly served nearly inedible food. … [The] film became the subject of angry debate among Mexican citizens and government leaders who were leery of romanticizing Villa.

Meanwhile, Lee Tracy — originally cast in the role played by Erwin — made an absolute mess of things, and was fired. As described in TCM’s article:

Lee Tracy was known as one of the more enthusiastic drinkers in the film industry; his name was often mentioned in the same breath as such famous imbibers as John Barrymore and W.C. Fields. Tracy’s fast-talking persona was perfect for the character Johnny Sykes, and he filmed several key scenes with Hawks behind the camera. One Sunday, during a national holiday, the cast and crew were celebrating in the streets with the locals…except for Tracy, who was standing buck-naked on a balcony, shouting obscenities at the crowd. Eventually, he urinated on a group of Mexican military cadets and had to be rushed out of the country lest he be strung up for his anti-social behavior.

Tracy’s firing from the film led to a spat and break up between Hawks and David O. Selznick, with the eventual cost of this movie ballooning to over a million dollars. Watch for Fay Wray as one of many women Zapata is interested in and “wants to marry” (i.e., have sex with), though she’s having none of that:

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Atmospheric cinematography

Must See?
No; you can skip this one unless you’re a Wallace Beery fan.

Links:

Jour de Fete (1949)

Jour de Fete (1949)

“Let’s do it the American way!”

Synopsis:
After watching a film about high-powered new American postal services, a bicycle-riding country postman (Jacques Tati) delivers his mail in increasingly speedy ways.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Carnivals and Circuses
  • Comedy
  • French Films
  • Jacques Tati Films
  • Village Life

Review:
French comedic-auteur Jacques Tati’s first feature-length film (he made six in total) was this expansion of his 18-minute-short entitled “L’École des facteurs” (“School for Postmen”), about nothing more than a bumbling postman delivering mail around a village. There does happen to be a carnival taking place as the film opens, which provides many of the initial sight gags, including Tati’s attempt to help with the erection of a pole:

… and his interactions with a “round-about” (merry-go-round):

After Francois (Tati) watches a film about speedy new American postal methods — including use of helicopters and motorcycles ridden through blazing fires (!) — the entire focus of the remaining storyline (such as it is) is on his zealous attempts to get mail more quickly to residents.

While several of Tati’s later films are considered must-see by many, this earlier outing is only required viewing for those interested in the evolution of his unique comedic style.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Fine location shooting in Sainte-Sévère-sur-Indre
  • Numerous instances of masterfully choreographed physical humor

Must See?
No. Listed as a film with Historical Importance in the back of Peary’s book.

Links:

Macbeth (1948)

Macbeth (1948)

“Your face, my lord, is as a book where men may read strange matters.”

Synopsis:
When a trio of witches prophesize that an 11th century thane named Macbeth (Orson Welles) will become king of Scotland, Macbeth — with support from his ambitious wife (Jeanette Nolan) — murders the king and takes over the crown, but the couple is soon consumed with paranoia over their newfound power.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Orson Welles Films
  • Play Adaptation
  • Plot to Murder
  • Roddy McDowell Films
  • Royalty and Nobility
  • Shakespeare

Response to Peary’s Review:
Peary writes that this “dark, stylized adaptation of Shakespeare by Orson Welles” — “filmed on ‘B’ western sets at Republic Studios” — features “surrealistic and expressionistic flourishes,” and “can easily be seen as a visualization of Macbeth’s worst nightmare.” The fact that “Welles alters Shakespeare’s concept of the three witches and has them prophesy Macbeth’s initial success and ultimate downfall:

… confirms that Welles wanted his Macbeth to be as out of control of his destiny as he’d be if he were in a dream.” Peary argues that while the “picture gets off to a marvelous start,” Welles “cannot sustain the early power,” and “for some reason, listening to the speeches becomes difficult.” (He adds, “I think it would have worked much better as a silent film.”) However, while he believes “this is not a great Welles film, it does allow him to play the mammoth personality from whom many of his other characterizations developed” —

— “a man of conceit who achieves a lofty position, tremendous power, and (historical) significance by relinquishing his idealism and morality and committing ‘crimes’ (for which he feels guilt) against humanity.”

Perhaps inevitably, Welles’ adaptation was roundly criticized upon its release, for myriad reasons — ranging from the attempted Scottish accents of his cast (which were dubbed in response, then restored again in 1980), to the low-budget, intentionally stylized sets and costumes, to the many shifts and cuts made to the original play itself. These days, however, it stands out as a typically ambitious outing by Welles, who made good use of limited shooting days and funding, and infused his film with atmospheric dread throughout:

While it’s almost certainly not the “best” or most “authentic” Macbeth adaptation out there (I have yet to revisit Polanski’s 1971 version), I think film fanatics will appreciate seeing this iteration by one of America’s most innovative auteurs.

Note: Look for Roddy McDowall as Malcolm:

… Dan O’Herlihy (of Robinson Crusoe fame) as Macduff:

… and Welles’ daughter Christopher as Macduff’s son:

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • John L. Russell’s atmospheric cinematography
  • Effectively stylized sets and costumes
  • Jeanette Nolan as Lady Macbeth

Must See?
Yes, as a fine low-budget adaptation by a master director.

Categories

  • Important Director

Links:

Terra Trema, La (1948)

Terra Trema, La (1948)

“Fear for hunger haunts the fishermen.”

Synopsis:
A family of Sicilian fishermen in the coastal village town of Aci Trezza struggle to open and keep their own business going, rather than selling to middlemen.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Fishermen
  • Italian Films
  • Labor Movements
  • Luchino Visconti Films

Review:
Luchino Visconti’s second feature-length narrative film was this “docufiction” outing with a cast of all uncredited native Sicilians, very loosely based on Giovanni Verga’s 1881 novel I Malavoglia. It tells a brutal tale of a working class family (the Valastros) attempting to exercise their right to self-determination, but failing miserably through no fault of their own (their boat is destroyed in extreme weather), then being mocked or shunned by nearly all around them.

Anyone expecting a happy resolution will be disappointed; rather, one should go into this film knowing that Visconti meant to make a trilogy (with the final film ending on a more triumphant note), but stopped here. On the plus side, the non-professional cast is highly photogenic, and effective at simply playing a version of themselves (below is Antonio Arcidiacono as the oldest son in the Valastro family):

There are a few moments of gentle poignancy and sweetness:

… but for the most part, we are simply reminded by this movie that life in post-WWII Italy was hard-scrabble for most, and that it was nearly impossible to survive without relying on noblesse oblige and unquestioningly accepting one’s role in the class-based status quo.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Fine cinematography

  • Excellent use of authentic locales and daily life

Must See?
Yes, for its historical significance within neo-realist cinema. Listed as a film with Historical Importance in the back of Peary’s book.

Categories

  • Historically Relevant
  • Important Director

Links:

Twelve O’Clock High (1949)

Twelve O’Clock High (1949)

“Consider yourselves already dead. Once you accept that idea, it won’t be so tough.”

Synopsis:
When the beloved commander (Gary Merrill) of a bombing crew is deeply shaken after a casualty-filled flight, his superior (Millard Mitchell) orders him replaced by a hard-nosed general (Gregory Peck) who preaches hard work and relentless courage above all else. Will Peck’s unemotional approach help his men reduce their heavy losses, or demoralize them even further?

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Airplanes and Pilots
  • Dean Jagger Films
  • Gary Merrill Films
  • Gregory Peck Films
  • Henry King Films
  • Hugh Marlowe Films
  • Military
  • Paul Stewart Films
  • World War II

Review:
This Oscar-nominated adaptation of a 1948 novel by screenwriters Sy Bartlett and Beirne Lay, Jr. (veterans of the U.S.’s Eighth Air Force) is highly regarded as a powerful and authentic depiction of the human toll of combat, and was lauded for shifting away from the more optimistic tone of most wartime films until then. Given that this is a movie about air force pilots, we see surprisingly little combat or flights; instead, after opening with a framing flashback involving a major (Dean Jagger) visiting a now-empty empty airfield, the film shows us pilots arriving back after a traumatic flight with one asking outright, “What do I do with an arm, sir?”

This intentionally shocking line is meant to show us how normalized horrific scenarios have become for these men — and we sympathize completely not only with the traumatized pilots but with their commander (Merrill), who wonders how much the boys can handle:

“Do they know up here what my boys have been taking for three days in a row? That they’ll be up all night to get 18 in the air for tomorrow? How much do you think they can take? You know they’re falling asleep at briefing? Are you gonna drive them till they crack? … Those boys are flesh and blood. They’ll die for you, but they’ve got to have a chance and they know they haven’t got one.”

The remainder of the film pivots to Peck, whose approach is polar opposite to Merrill’s:

“I’m not trying to tell you not to be afraid. Fear is normal. But stop worrying about it and about yourselves. Stop making plans. Forget about going home.”

To the film’s credit, no artificial dramas or conflicts are created between individuals jockeying for power. Instead, we get the real sense that these leaders are trying to figure out precisely the best way to motivate their men to knowingly risk their lives for the sake of a bigger cause — even if this involves using harsh language to call out cowardice, as when Peck speaks bluntly to a legacy pilot (Hugh Marlowe) who has not been pulling his weight:

“You’re the son of one fine officer and the grandson of another… As far as I’m concerned, you’re yellow. A traitor to yourself, to this group, to the uniform you wear… I hate a man like you so much that I’m gonna get your head down in the mud and tramp on it. I’m gonna make you wish you’d never been born.”

Yikes. Will this approach work? Eventually, we find out. By the time we finally see later fight sequences (including Peck himself up in the air):

… we know that none of the choices that have been made are easy, and that all men eventually “break” at some point. What matters is the collective efficacy they’ve built together.

Note: In case you’re wondering about the film’s title (I was), according to Wikipedia:

The term “twelve o’clock high” refers to the practice of calling out the positions of attacking enemy aircraft by reference to an imaginary clock face, with the bomber at the center. The terms “high” (above the bomber), “level” (at the same altitude as the bomber) and “low” (below the bomber) further refine the location of the enemy. Thus “twelve o’clock high” meant the attacker was approaching from directly ahead and above. This location was preferred by German fighter pilots because, until the introduction of the Bendix chin turret in the B-17G model, the nose of the B-17 was the most lightly armed and vulnerable part of the bomber. Enemy fighter aircraft diving from above were also more difficult targets for the B-17 gunners due to their high closing speeds. Bartlett’s wife, actress Ellen Drew, named the story after hearing Bartlett and Lay discuss German fighter tactics, which usually involved head-on attacks from “twelve o’clock high”.

Notable Performances, Qualities, and Moments:

  • Gregory Peck as General Savage
  • Fine supporting performances
  • Leonard Shamroy’s cinematography
  • A strong screenplay by Sy Bartlett and Beirne Lay, Jr.

Must See?
Yes, as a powerful military drama. Selected in 1998 for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

Categories

  • Good Show
  • Oscar Winner or Nominee

Links: