Undertaker and His Pals, The (1966)

“Remember: we specifically agreed that I could bury doc’s mistakes!”

Detective Harry Glass (James Westmoreland) investigates a rash of violent murders committed by a trio of motorcycle-riding thugs; soon he learns that a greedy undertaker (Ray Dannis) and his two restaurant-owning friends are behind the gruesome killings — and that the female corpses are being served as Specials of the Day.


At just a little over an hour, this trashy gore-fest (reminiscent of both Herschell Gordon Lewis and Ted Mikels’ work) is surprisingly easy to handle — which is not to say that it’s very good. No, the acting, special effects, and storyline are just as sub-par as one would expect, and there are far too many awful slapstick sequences inserted for no good reason at all; yet the tongue of director T.L.P. Swicegood (pseudonym, anyone?!) seems firmly in cheek, and each scene — even bloody slaughters of nubile young women — is bathed in a glow of humorous unreality. Perhaps I’m being overly generous, but this one’s not quite as bad as you would think.

Redeeming Qualities and Moments:

  • Colorful low-budget sets
    Undertaker Colors
  • The amusing closing sequence, in which every character who’s died comes back to life
    Undertaking Closing
  • Plenty of tongue-in-cheek, twisted humor — as when a photo of a sailor keeps changing expressions during his girlfriend’s bloody murder
    Undertaker Photo

Must See?
No, but any fans of trash cinema will certainly want to check it out.


One Response to “Undertaker and His Pals, The (1966)”

  1. Agreed; not a must – but trash cinema fans, take note.

    This is a genuinely gleeful slasher flick; the very low-budget cast/crew seem to be having quite a laugh – it’s almost like a private-party joke.

    There are actually a few funny gags (the best being the first murder) but it’s basically a one-note affair which, even at 63 min., seems long.

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