Way Out West (1937)

“I think we’ve given that deed to the wrong woman!”

Synopsis:
Laurel and Hardy head to Brushwood Gulch to deliver a gold mine deed to the daughter (Rosina Lawrence) of a dead prospector. Once there, however, they find themselves swindled by the girl’s bosses (Jimmy Finlayson and Sharon Lynn), and must do what they can to return the deed to its rightful owner.

Genres:

Response to Peary’s Review:
As Peary notes, this classic Laurel and Hardy flick is “consistently funny”, “well-paced”, and full of “sight gags, slapstick, and witty verbal repartee”. Along with Sons of the Desert (1933) and Block-Heads (1938) (both also recommended by Peary), it is required Laurel and Hardy viewing for any film fanatic.

Redeeming Qualities and Moments:

  • Hardy forcing a tearful Laurel to eat his hat
  • Stan using his thumb as a lighter
  • Lynn tickling Hardy into giving her the will
  • Laurel and Hardy’s soft-shoe dance number
    Soft Shoe

Must See?
Yes. This is one of Laurel and Hardy’s best works, and not to be missed.

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One Response to “Way Out West (1937)”

  1. First viewing. FINALLY! – something by L&H that I feel (well, mostly) positive about as a must.

    What makes ‘WOW’ work so well is its ‘suspenseful’ script. Here the boys have more of a real plot to play with – and are less hampered by slapstick. In fact, the physical humor employed this time around is quite often clever and inventive, esp. as it ties into the farcical situation laid out.

    There are added treats: as noted, the charming soft-shoe number early on; L&H singing ‘The Trail of the Lonesome Pine’ (with some delightful dubbing on Laurel’s part); the closing number L&H sing with Lawrence, etc.

    If ‘WOW’ doesn’t completely wow me (can’t say I’m thrilled with the lengthy hat-eating scene), it’s hard to fault it much. There are some genuine surprises and a few times I was overcome with the giggles. Honestly.

    While watching, I had the thought that this would be a good one for an older ff to share with a younger one that’s budding.

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