Diva (1981)

Diva (1981)

“She’s the queen of the night.”

Synopsis:
A French postman (Frederic Andrei) obsessed with the music of an American opera singer (Wilhelmenia Wiggins Fernandez) secretly tapes her performance and shares it with a young teen (Thuy An Luu) who lives with a Zen-like older mentor (Richard Bohringer). Meanwhile, the girlfriend (Chantal Deruaz) of a corrupt police commissioner (Jacques Fabbri) is murdered by henchmen (Gerard Damon and Dominique Pinon) just after dropping an evidence-filled tape into the basket of Andrei’s moped, and Andrei soon finds himself pursued not only by Damon and Pinon, but by a pair of Taiwanese gangsters interested in his pirated tape of Fernandez, as well as a dedicated female cop (Anny Romand) and her male accomplice.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • French Films
  • Gangsters
  • Obsessive Fans
  • Opera
  • Singers

Response to Peary’s Review:
Peary writes that this “goofy, glittery, dazzlingly stylish suspense thriller by first-time director Jean-Jacques Beneix became an immediate cult sensation in France and America,” noting that while “some critics complained that Beneix’s work was self-consciously (Pop) arty”, “surely the story, from a novel by Delacorta (Daniel Odier), is bizarre enough to warrant a wild style.” He points out that the protagonist, Jules (Andrei), “lives in one of Beineix’s fascinating sets (designed by Hilton McConnico): a dark loft full of stereo equipment, wrecked cars, and Pop art (including large photos of cars)”, and he notes that the “quirkiness of the film is evident in [the] three major character couplings: Jules, an 18-year-old, white, passive Frenchman, and Cynthia [Fernandez], the taller, 30-ish, black American performer; Alba [Luu], a teenage, hedonistic Vietnamese shoplifter and Gorodosh [Bohringer], her adult, white, Zen-freak boyfriend; the tall, handsome, suave Latin thug [Damon] and his short, indented-faced, punk-garbed, blond, younger partner (Dominique Pinon is a memorable screen villain), who always has a Walkman blaring in his ears.”

Peary points out that “Beineix underscores [these] odd teams by mixing rock and classical music”, and that “visually, Beineix uses his frame like a Pop-art canvas, filling the spaces between his black, blue, and red images with white light, direct or reflected.” (Beineix’s DP was Philippe Rousselot.) He notes that Beineix is “thrilled with movement, so he places his characters on wheels (Jules’s moped, Gorodosh’s classic white Citroen, Alba’s roller skates, etc.) and lets the camera run wild, almost as if it had a life of its own. (One of the highlights is a made car-motorcycle chase.)” He adds that Beineix “makes weird choices at every turn and very few don’t have big payoffs.”

Peary elaborates on his detailed analysis of this film in his Cult Movies 3 book, where he notes that “it is precisely Beineix’s determination to mix diverse elements such as opera and a lowbrow crime drama that makes the film so outrageous and entertaining”, and points out that Beineix’s “actors come in all shapes and sizes and from various backgrounds”. He argues that what the film’s survivors “have in common is a capacity to love people and love good music” — indeed, “love and music are shown to be pure, purifying forces”, while “the criminals are those people who prostitute love… or music…; in the minds of Delacorta and Beineix the businessmen who deal in record piracy are just as ruthless as down-and-dirty street criminals.”

Peary ends his lengthy Cult Movies review by noting that “the film is about how a singer’s lovely voice and a series of strange circumstances cause Jules, Cynthia, Alba and Gorodish to interact”, with the result “that all of them break out of their depressed past-obsessed states, reveal inner goodness…, find love, and make commitments to the future”. He notes that while this is a “cheery, sentimental theme that would seem out of place in typical low-budget crime thrillers”, he thinks “it’s one of the reasons Diva is such a crowd pleaser” — and I agree. This delightful, quirky, visually vibrant flick remains as unique as it was upon its release, and has held up remarkably well — there’s no other film quite like it, and I doubt there ever will be.

Redeeming Qualities and Moments:

  • Vibrant cinematography


  • Highly unique and stylized sets


  • The exciting moped/subway sequence
  • Vladimir Cosma’s score

Must See?
Yes, as an enduring cult classic.

Categories

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I’m All Right Jack (1959)

I’m All Right Jack (1959)

“It’s not compulsory, only you’ve got to join — see?”

Synopsis:
An upper-classman (Ian Carmichael) hoping to find a job in “industry” starts working for his wealthy uncle (Dennis Price) in a munitions factory, not realizing that he will quickly become embroiled in tensions between a trade union steward (Peter Sellers) and an old army buddy (Terry-Thomas) with corrupt plans for re-routing the company’s contract.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Class Relations
  • Labor Movements
  • Peter Sellers Films
  • Satires and Spoofs

Review:
Peary writes that this “classic British satire” by John and Ray Boulting — about a “naive but enthusiastic college grad who uses his wealthy family’s connections to break into industry” and then “becomes the unwitting pawn of both the corrupt management and the workers’ union” — remains a “sharp, cynical comedy” that “chastises workers, but is clearly sympathetic toward them” given “they’re not bad sorts, and much preferable to their sneaky, crooked bosses who are willing to sell out their country for a profit.” He adds that he doubts “if an American union-made film will ever deal so bravely with similar labor-management problems”. While this film mercilessly skewers labor-related problems of the day in a way that likely resonated deeply with many viewers, I’ll admit to feeling a bit detached from it: the basic theme of corruption on both sides of the aisle — not just with smarmy businessmen (of course), but with labor unions determined to ensure that “no worker is fired, be he incompetent, lazy, or doing work that a machine could handle in a tenth of the time” — is loud and strong, but the protagonist is too much of a twit to relate to in any way. Sellers is a top reason to watch the film: his devotion to the cause of Labor comes through loud and strong, and his character seems like a flesh-and-blood individual capable of authentic growth and emotion.

Redeeming Qualities and Moments:

  • Peter Sellers as Fred Kite

Must See?
No, though it’s worth a look.

Links:

Greetings (1968)

Greetings (1968)

“Like cats, there are so many young people, wandering to and fro.”

Synopsis:
Three friends — a draft-avoiding sex-seeker (Jonathan Warden), a Peeping Tom (Robert De Niro), and an obsessive follower of JFK’s assassination (Gerrit Graham) — spend time in New York City while the Vietnam War rages.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Brian DePalma Films
  • Counterculture
  • Episodic Films
  • New York City
  • Peeping Toms
  • Robert De Niro Films

Response to Peary’s Review:
Peary writes that this “seriocomedy, made in two weeks for a mere $43,000 by 28-year-old Brian De Palma, was one of the most popular ‘anti-establishment’ pictures of the late sixties and early seventies,” and “was that rare film made for filmmakers and film students as much as for the young, alienated, angry generation.” He argues it’s a “splendid example of the type of independent films made then: there are technical lapses and sloppy editing and photography throughout — but there are moments of cinematic brilliance,” and while the “wild, slapdash humor” is “original”, at times it is also “smug, vulgar, and self-congratulatory.” He points out the theme of obsession woven throughout each of the three main characters, but also — and most especially — De Palma himself, who “reveals here that he is obsessed with and is exploring the very nature of film.”

Peary elaborates upon all these points in his lengthier Cult Movies review, where he discusses the many cinematic influences on display. He writes that while “De Palma’s studio-backed pictures of the seventies and eighties invariably call attention to Alfred Hitchcock,” the “cinema-verite look to some of the scenes and the use of new footage and segments of Lyndon Johnson speeches… to counterpoint the disturbing images of ‘reality’ we see, suggest the influence of such diverse documentarians of the period as D.A. Pennebacker [Don’t Look Back, (1967)] and Emile D’Antonio [Point of Order, (1964); Millhouse: A White Comedy (1967)].” Meanwhile, as Graham “starts examining photos of the Kennedy assassination and considers enlarging some to see if he can discover another gunman in Dallas’s infamous grassy knoll, he becomes increasingly like the David Hemmings character in Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-Up (1966).” Finally, Peary points out De Palma’s obvious debt to Jean-Luc Godard, given that “the young characters who inhabit De Palma’s world could very well be acquaintances of Jean-Pierre Leaud and his compadres in Godard’s Masculine Feminine (1966) and La Chinoise (1967).”

Peary goes on to writes about how “Greetings is most interesting today as a testament of its times” (I agree). He notes that “not only does it reflect the political unrest and malaise of 1968 America — and the despair in Vietnam — but it… has a left-wing, anti-government/society/authority/status quo bias” and “is concerned with disillusioned young [white, heterosexual] males” (the genders, races, and sexual orientations of the protagonists would surely be more diverse if the film were made today) “who look for a direction in and meaning to life (another side to the previous year’s The Graduate.”) Indeed, much of this film should feel quite familiar in many ways to millenials, who are similarly skeptical of their government and seeking a point to their lives in the midst of rampant commercialism, greed, violence, racism, and (currently) a global pandemic. Even if technology has advanced, we remain — like the three characters here — obsessed with voyeurism, sex, and conspiracy; not that much has changed.

Redeeming Qualities and Moments:

  • An intriguing time-capsule glimpse into a certain era of American history

  • Many memorably quirky and/or amusing moments

Must See?
Yes, as a one-time cult favorite.

Links:

Stormy Weather (1943)

Stormy Weather (1943)

“Tell these fools anything, but tell me the truth.”

Synopsis:
A World War I veteran (Bill Robinson) reflects back on his rise to fame as a dancer, which started when he and his buddy (Dooley Wilson) met a beautiful singer (Lena Horne), and continued along a path filled with many talented artists and performances.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • African-Americans
  • Aspiring Stars
  • Dancers
  • Flashback Films
  • Musicals

Review:
The paper-thin romantic flashback “plot” matters not at all in this delightful musical revue from 20th Century Fox, featuring toe-tapping performances by Robinson and Horne, as well as Fats Waller, Ada Brown, Cab Calloway, and the inimitable Nicholas Brothers [who were also stand-out highlights in Kid Millions (1934) and Down Argentine Way (1940)]. It’s hard to pick a favorite, given they’re all well presented and performed with enormous enthusiasm — but my personal top-picks would likely be the Nicholas Brothers’ dancing “Jumpin’ Jive” (purportedly named by Fred Astaire as the “greatest movie musical number he’d ever seen”), Horne’s rendition of the title song, Robinson tap dancing on ashes on a boat to Memphis, and Fats Waller and his orchestra performing “Ain’t Misbehavin'”.

Redeeming Qualities and Moments:

  • Countless (actually, close to 20) enjoyable musical performances by powerhouse Black musical icons




Must See?
Yes, as an invaluable and still most-enjoyable all-black musical revue. Listed as a film with Historical Importance and a Personal Recommendation in the back of Peary’s book.

Links:

Cage Aux Folles, La (1979)

Cage Aux Folles, La (1979)

“We have to marry her off in great splendor. You’ll be the symbol of tradition once again.”

Synopsis:
When his son (Remy Laurent) announces he’s getting married to the daughter (Lisa Maneri) of a conservative couple (Carmen Scarpitta and Michel Galabru), the owner (Ugo Tognazzi) of a nightclub featuring transvestite dancers realizes he’ll have to send his long-time partner (Michel Serrault) away and invite his son’s estranged mother (Claire Maurier) to dinner that night — but Serrault, appropriately indignant, refuses to leave. How will the situation turn out?

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Comedy
  • French Films
  • Gender Bending
  • Homosexuality
  • Mistaken or Hidden Identities
  • Morality Police
  • Nightclubs
  • Play Adaptation

Response to Peary’s Review:
Peary is clearly no fan of this “French farce” which “became the most successful foreign film ever to play in the U.S., raking in more than $40 million and playing in some theaters for more than a year.” He notes that given how “it caused so much excitement among those who loved it or despised it”, it’s “startling how innocuous it is;” he goes on to refer to it as a “dishonest film” that is “so timid it suggests that this gay couple could raise a heterosexual son — and a boring son at that” (?!?). He’s right to point out that the film “plays it [too] safe, catering to straight audiences” to the extent that the only “lovemaking scene” we see “involves [Tognazzi] with a female, his ex-wife”. He also points out that much of the film’s “humor comes at the gay characters’ expense; repeatedly we are supposed to laugh at how effeminate [Serrault] and butler Jacob [Benny Luke] are, at how exaggerated their mannerisms are, at how awkward they look when walking or gesturing, at how affected their voices are … , and how they whine or scream in surprise over everything.”

Unfortunately, “director-co-writer Edouard Molinaro never bothers to explore the subtleties of his characters or accentuate their endearing idiosyncrasies”: Tognazzi “tolerates [Serrault] in [a] conventional movie fashion — like a husband who accepts the childish activities and personality of his wife because she is female and is supposed to act that way;” and “there are surprisingly few funny moments in the major sequence in which [Tognazzi] and [Serrault] try to clean up their act when [Tognazzi’s] son brings home for dinner his fiancee, her mother, and her father… who is the secretary for the Union of Moral Order.” Peary argues that while “there’s potential for fireworks”, “Molinaro forgot the matches”. He rags further on the film in his Cult Movies book, where he states that “Molinaro has no flare for comedy and never lets a scene run long enough for the gags to develop sufficiently.”

Peary does concede that there are at least “several amusing moments in the picture”, including “when [Tognazzi] toasts [Maneri] over the phone by breaking a glass on the receiver;” “when [Tognazzi] instructs [Serrault] how to butter his toast and stir his tea in a masculine manner;” and “when [Scarpitta] and [Serrault] quibble over whether the nude figures on the dinner dishes are all boys, as [Scarpitta] insists, or are male and female, as [Serrault] fibs.” Ultimately, however, Peary dismisses this film as “a family comedy that never rises above a level of mediocrity” — as “rollicksome as the most tired French bedroom farce but not as risque, as stupid a Laura Antonelli sex comedy but not as arousing, and as ‘controversial’ and ‘relevant’ as Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? (1967) is today.”

While I enjoyed this “innocuous” cult comedy more than Peary, I agree with many of his assessments. It’s weird — though perhaps not surprising, given the intended audience — that Tognazzi allows himself to be “seduced” by Maurier (perhaps this was done to “prove” that Laurent could have been conceived once upon a long time ago?), and much of the humor-at-the-expense-of-homosexuality comes across as terribly dated these days. How much you laugh may depend on how much you can simply giggle uncomfortably — something that’s NOT possible in any way with Luke’s portrayal of a servile black “maid” (everything about how his character is presented and treated rings distasteful). With that said, I think all film fanatics should watch this film once to become familiar with it, though it likely won’t become a repeat favorite.

Redeeming Qualities and Moments:

  • Michel Serrault as Albin

Must See?
Yes, once, for its cult status.

Categories

Links:

Two-Lane Blacktop (1971)

Two-Lane Blacktop (1971)

“They’re just a bunch of small-town car freaks, that’s all they are.”

Synopsis:
As the driver (James Taylor) and the mechanic (Dennis Wilson) of a souped up ’55 Chevy drive across the country looking for opportunities to race, they pick up a young hitchhiker (Laurie Bird) and eventually meet the middle-aged owner (Warren Oates) of a GTO who’s willing to race them cross-country for high stakes.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Car Racing
  • Monte Hellman Films
  • Road Trip
  • Warren Oates Films

Response to Peary’s Review:
Peary writes that while “Monte Hellman’s film” — predicted to be “the movie of the year” and “turn the youth market as only Easy Rider had” — “never lived up to its pre-release publicity”, it remains “a unique, thematically interesting film that has deservedly become a cult favorite.” He describes it as an existential film in which The Driver (Taylor) and The Mechanic (Wilson) “race their car… back and forth across America’s highways and byways — going fast but going nowhere on the metaphorical endless highway of meaningless life.” Given how much loving attention is paid (by Hellman) to The Car, Peary notes that “we learn more about [it] than about the zombielike men who ride in it,” whose rare conversation are “only about cars and racing.” Indeed, even when The Girl (Bird) “enters their life” and “swims nude in front of them, they reminisce about old cars, not old flames.”

Peary points out that “The Driver and the Mechanic epitomize the sad products of a frustration-making D.C. bureaucracy, specifically a Nixon government which is conducting a controversial war that makes complete apathy as inviting as a warm cozy bed.” He notes that “while other films were about the alienation of the drug culture and war protesters, Hellman’s pessimistic film is about the alienation of everyone else: both those who race around the desolate, poor, conservative country and all those people inside the cubicles they pass who are just as withdrawn and isolated from the problems/horrors of their world.”

Peary discusses Two-Lane Blacktop at greater length in his Cult Movies book, where he notes that he finds it “so much more honest and less exploitative than the similarly plotted box office smash Easy Rider, another film about a routeless odyssey across America undertaken by society’s dropouts.” He describes Oates as, “as usual, a standout, showing the wide range of emotions of a troubled man” and providing “much wit to the film”. He adds that “most amusing, and pathetic, is how he keeps picking up the worst brand of hitchhikers… but keeps trying to find ideal companionship.” Peary asserts that while he likes this movie — “its characters, and its premise” — he finds the “beginning of the film… compelling” but “toward the end it becomes a bit tiresome and fizzles — just like the race.” I think that’s exactly the point, however. As The Girl makes yet another random decision near the end of the film about who she’ll hang out and travel with, we see that nothing’s really changed — life will continue to be about distraction, alienation, and thwarted attempts to connect; Two-Lane Blacktop is remarkably effective at portraying those still-enduring challenges of existence.

Redeeming Qualities and Moments:

  • Warren Oates as GTO
  • Many memorable moments
  • An authentic sense of time and place

  • Fine cinematography


Must See?
Yes, as a cult favorite.

Categories

(Listed in 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die)

Links:

Beneath the Valley of the Ultravixens (1979)

Beneath the Valley of the Ultravixens (1979)

“The dawn’s early light comes to Small Town every day — and with it, the events of the night before are forgotten.”

Synopsis:
A woman (Kitten Navidad) whose sexual appetites can’t be fulfilled by her husband (Ken Kerr) tries everything she can to help him learn how to have sex the “right way”.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Adult Films
  • Marital Problems
  • Russ Meyer Films
  • Satires and Spoofs
  • Sexuality
  • Small Town America

Review:
Russ Meyer’s final feature was this satirical take (scripted under a pen name by Roger Ebert) on Our Town, in which an earnest narrator (Stuart Lancaster) tells us about the strange sex lives — both fulfilling and otherwise — of various residents in Smalltown. It’s as close as Meyer ever came to making an actual hardcore film, and I’m categorizing it as such here (it received an X rating) — but once/if you get beyond the relentless sex scenes, it’s possible to reflect on the humor and absurdity of the situation, in which Kerr nearly loses his job working for a female dump station owner (June Mack) because of his preferences, and only an ultra-busty evangelical radio announcer (Ann Marie) can potentially “save” Kerr from his own impulses. Homosexuality is most definitely mocked and denigrated, with a dentist/counselor named “Dr. Lavender” (Robert E. Pearson) attempting to force Kerr “out of the closer” using a chainsaw — but is that any more ridiculous or offensive than the many other sex-based scenarios taking place? Not really.

Redeeming Qualities and Moments:

  • A sometimes humorous take on “Our Town”

Must See?
No; this one is only must-see for Meyer completists.

Links:

Supervixens (1975)

Supervixens (1975)

“Not ready, with my beautiful body? You’ve gotta lot of nerve, buster!”

Synopsis:
A gas station attendant (Charles Pitts) called back home by his sexually aggressive girlfriend Supervixen (Shari Eubank) ends up in a domestic violence brawl that’s broken up by a psychopathic cop (Charles Napier). When Napier is sexually humiliated by Supervixen, he kills her and Pitts flees, knowing he’ll be blamed for the murder. During his “road trip”, Pitts is relentlessly seduced and harrassed by busty females who won’t take no for an answer — until he finally meets and falls in love with a kind cafe owner named SuperAngel (also Shari Eubank); but Napier is not yet done torturing Pitts and Eubank…

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Falsely Accused
  • Femmes Fatales
  • Police
  • Psychopaths
  • Russ Meyer Films

Review:
Russ Meyer’s return to a more independent style of “adult entertainment” after Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (1970) resulted in a reiteration of his key preoccupations — busty, sexually voracious, emasculating dames and uber-violent, insecure men — but kicked up a notch, with an early bathtub murder scene especially graphic and misogynistic. It’s somewhat humorous seeing how “poor” Pitts simply can’t catch a break when it comes to horny women (he really is a basically good guy), and Napier seems to be delighting in the devilish extremes he’s allowed to go to with his Bad Cop Extraordinaire. (It’s interesting knowing that Meyer’s absentee dad was a policeman…) The notion of casting Eubank in dual roles works nicely; she does a decent acting job, and one wonders why she left the industry after starring in just one more Meyer flick. The violent ending hearkens back to Finders Keepers, Lovers Weepers! (1968), Cherry, Harry & Raquel! (1969), and BTVOTD — albeit with a (literally) cartoonish twist.

Redeeming Qualities and Moments:

  • Charles Napier’s unhinged performance as Harry Sledge

  • Shari Eubank as SuperVixen and SuperAngel

Must See?
No, though of course it’s must-see for Meyer fans.

Links:

Cherry, Harry & Raquel! (1969)

Cherry, Harry & Raquel! (1969)

“Nevertheless, pity the poor potheads.”

Synopsis:
While a busty Swede (Uschi Digard) runs naked across the desert, a corrupt sheriff (Charles Napier) working in collusion with a marijuana dealer (Franklin Bolger) and a Chicano deputy (Bert Santos) tries to track down an elusive competitor known as “The Apache”. Meanwhile, Napier sleeps with both a busy prostitute named Raquel (Larissa Ely) and his nurse-girlfriend Cherry (Linda Ashton), who eventually fall for each other as well.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Drug Dealers
  • Sheriffs and Marshalls
  • Russ Meyer Films

Response to Peary’s Review:
Peary writes that this “compact Russ Meyer film” features a “tried-and-true combination of sex, violence, and humor”, with the injection of “intentionally silly footage of superstacked Uschi Digard romping naked (but for an Indian warbonnet) around [the] desert.” He asserts that while it’s “somewhat dated”, it “remains one of Meyer’s best films” given that it “has wit, sharp editing, several Don Siegel-like action sequences, and a solid lead in square-jawed Napier”. I can understand why Meyer fans would be enamored with this flick, which shows ample evidence of the gonzo-surreal sensibilities and rapid-fire editing that would infuse Meyer’s first major studio film, Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (1970). However, it’s really not for all tastes; my favorite moments came early on, during his laughably earnest opening voiceover: “The evil of marijuana caresses all it comes in contact with.”

Redeeming Qualities and Moments:

  • Fine location shooting
  • Skillful editing

Must See?
No, though I’m sure some film fanatics will be curious to check it out.

Links:

Finders Keepers, Lovers Weepers! (1968)

Finders Keepers, Lovers Weepers! (1968)

“You try any funny stuff on me, buster, and I’ll slice you up like a jigsaw puzzle.”

Synopsis:
As two ex-cons (Duncan McLeod and Robert Rudelson) wait until closing time to rob the safe of a topless dancing club, the club’s owner (Paul Lockwood) is lured to the home of a madam (Lavelle Roby), where he’s seduced by an Amish woman (Jan Sinclair) as well as Roby herself. Meanwhile, Lockwood’s sexually unsatisfied wife (Anne Chapman) has a guilty affair with the club’s bartender (Gordon Wescourt), and all three end up unwittingly involved in the heist back at the club.

Genres, Themes, Actors, and Directors:

  • Heists
  • Infidelity
  • Russ Meyer Films

Response to Peary’s Review:
Peary writes that this “piggy Russ Meyer film… probably won’t please even his diehard fans”, given that it “has none of the typical Meyer humor” and “even has a cruel edge to it.” He adds the unnecessary comment that “of course, the women have large chests; but they’re not particularly pretty — they’re the types who show up in stag films” (!!!). Vincent Canby’s review for the NY Times is a bit more delicately worded, if similarly dismissive: “Meyer’s sole preoccupation with extraordinarily well-developed female breasts, usually photographed from a low angle and while they’re in some sort of motion, is no longer particularly erotic.” (And kudos to Canby for introducing me to the new term “satyriasis.”) To Meyer’s credit, he perfectly captures the essence of the “male gaze” in the creatively shot and edited opening sequence of this film, which remains its artistic highlight.

Redeeming Qualities and Moments:

  • The cleverly filmed opening sequence


Must See?
No; this one is only must-see for Meyer fans.

Links: